What drives antimicrobial prescribing for companion animals? A mixed-methods study of UK veterinary clinics

Tompson, Alice C. and Chandler, Clare I.R. and Mateus, Ana L.P. and O’Neill, Dan G. and Chang, Yui-Mei and Brodbelt, Dave C. (2020) What drives antimicrobial prescribing for companion animals? A mixed-methods study of UK veterinary clinics. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. p. 105117. ISSN 01675877

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2020.105117

Abstract

Antimicrobial use in companion animals is a largely overlooked contributor to the complex problem of antimicrobial resistance. Humans and companion animals share living spaces and some classes of antimicrobials, including those categorised as Highest Priority Critically Important Antimicrobials (HPCIAs). Veterinary guidelines recommend that these agents are not used as routine first line treatment and their frequent deployment could offer a surrogate measure of ‘inappropriate’ antimicrobial use. Anthropological methods provide a complementary means to understand how medicines use makes sense ‘on-the-ground’ and situated in the broader social context.

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