Vestibular disease in dogs under UK primary-care veterinary care: epidemiology and clinical management

Radulescu, S M and Humm, K R and Eramanis, L M and Volk, H A and Church, D B and Brodbelt, D C and O'Neill, D G (2020) Vestibular disease in dogs under UK primary-care veterinary care: epidemiology and clinical management. [Dataset] (Unpublished)

[img] Spreadsheet (Excel spreadsheet containing demography and clinical information on 759 vestibular cases identified out of 905,544 study dogs)
200218 Vestibular Disease - ProblemReport.xlsx - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

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[img] Spreadsheet (CSV file containing demography and clinical information on 759 vestibular cases identified out of 905,544 study dogs)
200218 Vestibular Disease - ProblemReport.csv - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (598kB)

Abstract

The data includes 759 confirmed vestibular disease (VD) cases under primary veterinary care that were presenting clinical signs during 2016. Dogs ‘under veterinary care’ were defined as those with either at least one EPR recorded from January 1st to December 31st 2016 or, alternatively, at least one EPR during both 2015 and 2017. Case inclusion criteria required that a final diagnosis of VD or a synonym (e.g. vestibular attack, geriatric vestibular syndrome, canine idiopathic vestibular syndrome, old-dog vestibular disease) was recorded in the EPR for a condition that was present during the 2016 study period. Case-finding involved initial screening of all EPRs for candidate VD cases by searching the clinical free-text field and VeNom term field using the search terms nyst* and vest*. The full clinical notes for each confirmed vestibular case dog were manually reviewed to extract data on additional study questions of interest related to the VD: date of first diagnosis, clinical signs on first presentation, clinical management and treatments prescribed, referral, clinical improvement and death. Options for clinical signs at presentation included the presence, absence or unrecorded status for ataxia, nystagmus, head tilt, collapse, vomiting, otitis externa and central involvement (defined as one or more of the following: proprioceptive deficits, altered mentation, cranial nerve deficits other than VII or VIII and a vertical, positional or dysconjugate nystagmus). Improvement was defined as evidence of clinical improvement and absence of ataxia and nystagmus recorded in the EPR although these dogs may still have shown a residual head tilt.

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