Computed tomography versus arthroscopy for detection of canine elbow dysplasia lesions

Moores, A P and Benigni, L and Lamb, C R (2008) Computed tomography versus arthroscopy for detection of canine elbow dysplasia lesions. VETERINARY SURGERY, 37 (4). pp. 390-398.

[img] Text
1587.pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (827kB)

Abstract

Objective-To describe associations between computed tomography (CT) and arthroscopy in dogs with elbow dysplasia lesions. Study Design-Retrospective clinical study. Sample Population-Canine elbows (n = 101) investigated by CT and arthroscopy. Methods-CT scans were reviewed for 10 predetermined CT signs and graded for osteophyte size. Surgical reports were reviewed for specific disease features and cartilage erosion grades. Associations between variables were investigated with multivariate logistic regression and correlation between osteophyte size and cartilage erosion with Spearman's rank order correlation. Results-Medial coronoid process (MCP) fragment on CT was significantly associated with the arthroscopic identification of a displaced MCP fragment, cartilage erosion affecting the MCP, and cartilage erosion affecting the humeral condyle. Irregular radial incisure of the ulna on CT was significantly associated with the arthroscopic identification of cartilage erosion affecting the MCP. Osteophytes on CT were significantly associated with an abnormal arthroscopic examination. There was a moderately significant correlation between CT osteophyte grade and cartilage erosion grades for areas of the medial joint compartment (r(s)=0.44-0.48). Conclusion-Some CT signs are significantly associated with arthroscopic features of elbow dysplasia lesions in dogs; however, other CT signs were not associated with arthroscopic findings, and CT and arthroscopy can provide contradictory information. Osteophyte size is moderately correlated with cartilage erosion of the medial joint compartment. Clinical Relevance-CT can provide valuable information for the investigation of dogs with elbow dysplasia, but the absence of CT signs (or the absence of arthroscopic abnormalities) does not rule out elbow lesions. (C) Copyright 2008 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.